Last edited by Naran
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS found in the catalog.

Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS

Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS

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Published by Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Underwater acoustics.,
  • Whales -- Vocalization.,
  • Earthquakes.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementClyde E. Nishimura.
    ContributionsNaval Research Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationp. 91-101
    Number of Pages101
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17683308M

    Preliminary analysis of multibeam, subbottom, and water column data collected from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridge earthquake swarm sites, March-April Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting Abstract T23B Nishimura, C.E., and D. Conlon. IUSS dual use: Monitoring whales and earthquakes using SOSUS. The Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) was a passive acoustic system developed by the United States Navy to track Soviet system's true nature was classified with the name and acronym SOSUS themselves classified. The unclassified name Project Caesar was used to cover the installation of the system and a cover story developed regarding the shore stations, identified only as .

    Maintaining the volcano and earthquake news sections on this website, the free Volcano Webcams tool and interactive map widget is a free-time, both time- and server cost intensive effort. If you find the information useful and would like to support us, and help keep it alive and improve it, please consider making a small donation (PayPal). Maintaining the volcano and earthquake news sections on this website, the free Volcano Webcams tool and interactive map widget is a free-time, both time- and server cost intensive effort. If you find the information useful and would like to support us, and help keep it alive and improve it, please consider making a small donation (PayPal). Online cc payment Thank you!

    A unique whale call with 50–52 Hz emphasis from a single source has been tracked over 12 years in the central and eastern North Pacific. These calls, referred to as Hz calls, were monitored and analyzed from acoustic data recorded by hydrophones of the US Navy Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS.   D o whales hear earthquakes long before humans? As tsunami warnings hit the Indonesian and Sri Lankan coasts last week, observers at sea watched as every species of cetacean – from massive blue.


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Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS Download PDF EPUB FB2

Earthquakes and 2) to catalog the acoustic signals from large marine cetaceans to determine their spa- tim and temporal distributions in the Atlantic Ocean. We discuss use of IUSS data m the monitor- ing and detection of oceanic earthquakes in the At- lantic Ocean with an example from the Caribbean.

Get this from a library. Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS. [Clyde E Nishimura; Naval Research Laboratory (U.S.)]. IUSS Dual Use: Earthquake Research Routine monitoring on 28 December by the U.S. Navy of its SOSUS hydrophone arrays in the Atlantic Ocean revealed the onset of intense seismic activity north of the Virgin Islands.

The SOSUS arrays monitored at the Naval Ocean Pro-cessing Facility (NOPF), Dam Neck, VA, contin. Monitoring whales and earthquakes by using SOSUS [microform] / Clyde E. Nishimura Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Vents Program Acoustic Monitoring Project has performed continuous monitoring of ridge systems in the eastern Pacific since August, using the SOSUS network and autonomous hydrophones. Long-term monitoring of the central equatorial Pacific, North Atlantic, and Gulf of Alaska is in progress using moored autonomous hydrophones.

C.E. Nishimura, D.M. Conlon, IUSS dual use: Monitoring whales and earthquakes using SOSUS. Marine Technology Society Journal. 27, 13–13 () Google Scholar. The strength of acoustic monitoring of pelagic waters for calls produced by large whales, either by SOSUS or autonomous arrays, lies in its capability to detect whales in habitats out of reach of.

A U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft was directed to an area where blue whale calls had been detected on SOSUS using these methods, and the presence of a vocalizing blue whale was confirmed at the site with field recordings from sonobuoys.

Comparison between visual and passive acoustic detection of finless porpoises in the Yangtze River, China monitoring whales and earthquakes using SOSUS.

Article. Using earthquake sensors to track endangered whales by Hannah Hickey, University of Washington This image shows a fin whale surfacing in Greenland. Nishimuraand D. Conlon, “ IUSS dual use: Monitoring whales and earthquakes using SOSUS,” Mar.

Technol. Soc. 27, 13– 21 (). Hydrophone arrays such as those in the Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) hydroacoustic monitoring system have been successfully used to detect and monitor earthquakes.

For 20 years, researchers have used the SOSUS array in the northeast Pacific Ocean to monitor the ocean off the U.S. and Canadian West Coasts.

Therefore, our specific choice of beams to monitor in this initial stage reflects this decision. The array locations are classified so data must be processed at the secure facility at NRL (the Dual Use Analysis Center was designed to accommodate scientific research using SOSUS data (Nishimura and Conlon, ).

The archive tapes are sent to NRL at. The Cold War: History of the SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) The end of World War II (WWII) saw the beginning of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States and its allies. By earlythe U.S. Navy realized that Soviet submarines, which were based on the best of German WWII technology, posed a grave threat to America’s security.

Using SOSUS, we have recorded the very low-frequency, infrasonic signals of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and blue and fin whale calls, as well as the audible sounds of passing ships, and the background rumble of passing storm systems.

SOSUS (Sound Surveillance System) K. LEE LERNER Utilizing the unique properties of sound transmission in water, during the s, the United States Navy developed the Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS).

Code named "Jezebel" the SOSUS system provided critical monitoring of Soviet submarine and ship movements, especially through the critical ocean gaps between Greenland. SOSUS was installed by the US Navy beginning in the mids for classifiedantisubmarine warfare and surveillance during the Cold War.

SOSUS consists ofgroups of hydrophones that hear and record sound waves generatedby seismic events, submarines, or whales, for example. Using earthquake sensors to track endangered whales UW oceanographers use seismometers to study whales A series of three papers published this winter in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America interprets whale calls found in earthquake sensor data, an inexpensive and non-invasive way to monitor the whales.

The studies are the first. Experiments using ocean-bottom seismometers can detect seafloor earthquakes with precision, but they are best-suited to monitor small areas.

But now, the ending of the Cold War has given earth scientists an unprecedented opportunity to take advantage of a tool created to wage that war—a project launched by the U.S. Navy in the s that went. Whales are the largest species on Earth.

The four species in the project grow to a maximum length of 15 to 20 meters (around 50 to 65 feet). However, scientists are using satellites to count and catalog much smaller animals.

One study has counted albatross nests on the inhospitable, hard-to-reach islands the birds use as breeding grounds. The. SOSUS systems were so sensitive that trained observers could determine ship type—and in some cases, identify specific ships. SOSUS used arrays of hydrophones (underwater microphones) strategically placed along the ocean bottom.

The hydrophones were connected by cables to onshore monitoring .Depth of focus. Seismic wave data can also be used to calculate the depth of focus, or the vertical distance between the epicenter and the maximum depth for earthquakes is about kilometers ( miles).

Eighty‐five percent of all earthquakes have a shallow focus that can range as deep as 70 kilometers (40 miles); 12 percent have an intermediate focus that ranges from 70 to   Notes on Submarine Hunting Using Hydrophones, a book for British Naval officers, notes how hydrophones could be used to determine the .